Thursday, 18 February 2010

The complexities of residency deserve debate

The complexities of residency deserve debate

From The National: http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100216/OPINION/702159913/1080/NATIONAL

Peter Hellyer

* Last Updated: February 15. 2010 10:42PM UAE / February 15. 2010 6:42PM GMT

I read Sultan Al Qassemi’s column this week, where he suggests that “some” long-term expatriate residents should be given permanent residency status, with interest. It’s now 35 years since I first came to Abu Dhabi; if I can, I would like to spend more time here. I don’t have nightmares about being obliged to leave, but I do wonder how I would occupy myself if I moved to my house in Jersey, which has never been anything more than a holiday home for me, though I love it dearly.

Sultan’s suggestion, by the way, isn’t new. More than 20 years ago, a prominent Emirati businessman wrote a pamphlet that said much of the same, though it provoked little debate.

Sultan is absolutely right to stress that any creation of a permanent residency status for long-term expatriates, should not, and cannot, have any implications with regards to citizenship. If citizenship were granted more easily (albeit on the basis of individual approval by Government) to people who have been here for 25 years or more, a situation would rapidly arise where a large percentage of UAE citizens were of origins utterly unrelated to the country and its Muslim, Arab and Gulf heritage.

It’s hard enough, as it is, to preserve the special characteristics of the country without the introduction of a programme that would, in effect, mean that the people of the Emirates – the Emiratis – were giving it away. As we can see from Fiji, where citizens of Indian descent account for nearly 40 per cent of the population, in that direction lies a host of political, social and cultural problems.

It would be difficult, too, to extend the possibility – not the right – of long-term residency to the children of any long-term expatriates, particularly those born here or who have lived most or all of their lives here, though I appreciate the problems that many face in deciding where they actually belong.

In a piece last August another columnist for the paper, HA Hellyer, (who, as many readers may know, is my son, born in Abu Dhabi just over 30 years ago), wrote: “No child born to immigrants in the UAE ever says: ‘I am an Emirati’ – it is just not part of how people respond to the question of nationality. Children always refer to the country of their parents, even if they have been born and brought up in the UAE. So did my friend – until he went away to university. There, for the first time, he began to develop a sense of belonging to the UAE: not at the expense of his other identities, but in addition to them. One day, a new Emirati student at his university asked him: ‘Where are you from?’, and for the first time he replied: ‘I am from Abu Dhabi.’”

That’s a phrase I’ve used myself. I would never call myself an Emirati, but, after 35 years, I am certainly from Abu Dhabi, in a real, if not a complete, way, albeit happy to remain British as well, not just in terms of my citizenship but also in my own assessment of my identity, though I frequently tell younger Emiratis that I have lived here longer than they have, since I arrived before they were born. I know, perhaps, more Emirati history and geography than they do, though I know less of the traditions and, of course, the language.

I am pretty satisfied with the balance of being, in effect, both British and from Abu Dhabi. I can’t imagine being obliged to sacrifice either. Thus the issue of whether there should be a formal framework to allow some long-term expatriates to stay here is not merely, for me, an academic issue.

It is, though, enormously complex.

Some expatriates spend decades here, earning a living and raising their children without ever knowing the country itself. They do so almost entirely within a bubble, relating primarily to the expatriate community or communities, but without engaging with the Emirates and with Emiratis. They are among those mentioned by Mr Al Qassimi who, because of their age, face the problem of no longer being able to obtain residence visas.

There are others, including friends of mine, well past the age of retirement, who have identified in a more meaningful way with the country and who, because of the relationships they have developed over decades, continue to have visas, provided through the businesses they have created or through the good offices of Emirati friends that they have made.

Most of the expatriates who have spent much of their lives here are currently obliged to leave at 60 or thereabouts, taking with them not only their knowledge of the country but also the savings they have made. That is a matter of economic concern.

Policy makers, however, particularly those in the UAE with its enormous demographic imbalance between citizens and others, need to consider social issues too. What will be the nature of the state that will emerge in the future? What can those residents with any degree of permanency contribute to it?

Most new arrivals to the UAE do not emigrate here – as people emigrate from Britain to Australia or from India to Canada. They do not uproot themselves from their country of origin to put down roots in a new country. Some, a few, eventually do, but for many it’s always a temporary process, however long it lasts. Their hearts remain at home.

I would welcome a debate, between both Emiratis and expatriates, about the matters raised by Sultan Al Qassemi in his recent column. My own view is that there are many other aspects besides the length of time spent here that need to be taken into account in determining whether it is beneficial for the country to develop a formal framework that would permit long-term residents the right to stay for the rest of their lives.

Peter Hellyer is a writer and consultant who specialises in Emirati culture and heritage

44 comments:

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

You posted this here but didnt give your input at all.

Sultan needs to be arrested, beaten, and stripped of his citizenship, not for his beliefs, but because of his stupidity. I have yet to read a piece by him where I can say oh, yeah, that makes sense.

Shows you how the wasta card can get even the most stupid people heard in the UAE.

People shouldnt be made citizens BUT we should allow them to remain here forever.

No, we shouldnt allow ANYONE to live here for more than 15 years. You're here for 15 years, you get shipped back.

A steady temporary stream of people will ensure that the UAE keeps growing (I believe its grown too much and should stop) and will kill any thought of permanent residency or citizenship.

Permanent residency COULD be given to those who can SPEAK LIKE US, LOOK LIKE US, are MUSLIM.

So basically just people from other gulf countries. We dont nee Kumar and John being connected to the UAE in any way other than his contract.

Its stupid talk like Sultan's that will soon end up with groups of UAE citizens BOMBING places like JBR.

I await that day, I will laugh my ass off.

BuJ said...

ABIT, i'm not qualified to give an input. i'm a nobody.

just thought it would be interesting to hear people's opinions.. mind you.. i know what ur opinion is.. i'm just surprised ur so generous with 15 yrs..

i expected more like 15 months.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

I originally always said 5, but that was a bit unrealistic... or so I was told. 15 is good I think.

How'd you know what my opinion was? Hum?

Stimulus said...

I'd actually like to hear your opinion BuJ.

Anyway, ABIT, I think you're racist. Give citizenship to people who, inter alia, "LOOK LIKE US"??!!

The guy behind the article says extremely good points. It's true that Sultan didn't think thoroughly about it, and it shouldn't be based upon ONLY the number of years spent in the UAE. Other factors should be taken into consideration.

But this problem could be an added benefit to the UAE if thought about thoroughly. Their fear of giving out citizenships and losing their real identity is overcoming the opportunity of grabbing various benefits from having variety in their citizens.

In my opinion though, we all know that the Gulf is sooner or later going to face a sort of "third world war". It's coming, especially with Iran and Yemen and all the instability there. Therefore, to give citizenship, perhaps a sort of test for loyalty should be included. I don't know how this can be taken, but simply giving anyone citizenship and 10 years later facing a war, no one will be left in the UAE except, as he puts it, REAL Emaratis.

BuJ said...

ok Stimulus.. i'll give u my opinion.

look at the UAE history since day one.. even before the federation.. they used to hand out passports easily back in the pre-oil days.. some took them and some decided to stay with their current papers. some even took them then were told to give them back, but it's another story.

money spoils the story.. with the advent of oil, the uae changed its policy and made it harder to naturalise.

if you look at the emaratis today, they do not all look alike (sorry ABIT).. some come from yemen, some come from india, and a lot come from iran, and a trickle from other western arab countries.

in order to ensure a viable future the uae needs to look at demographics and how to fix the imbalance, and naturalisation and residency need to be carefully considered.

there are no easy choices.

work needs to be done both ways.. emaratis need to be more welcoming but also expats wanting to be emaratis need to adopt uae culture and at least speak arabic and be aware of uae customs.

things like islam etc are a plus, but u can argue it's needed as islam is the official religion in the uae. however i know of hindu families being naturalised, so there are obvious exceptions.

Media Junkie said...

BuJ, I think your opinions are much more well balanced and heart-warming.

Yes, naturalization and emigrating should be a two-way street. Expats wishing to remain in the country should be more aware of Emirati culture and traditions, including learning the language (which I admit I haven't done - but then again I'm not very good with learning a new language beyond English, my primary language).

However, I'm not quite sure about limiting or creating an 'Emirati' culture that is so narrowly-defined. Must be of one race, one culture, one dress, etc. As far as I know, there's even a class system within Emiratis so being 'Emirati' is no guarantee of feeling at home or being 'of the people'.

It is a complex situation. I'd say much more and would like to talk about it more, but I see no point when there seems to be no room for debate.

Stimulus said...

BuJ, well said, always add your opinion to your posts as well ;)

I completely agree, expats do need to adopt UAE culture to get a passport, rather than just "work in the UAE for a certain number of years". In the end, this benefits both parties: Somewhat of a cultural diversity for the UAE (which is a necessary pillar for any society to be sustainable) and all the benefits that come with citizenship for expats.

MJ, there's always a point behind a debate, you never know who's reading this blog ;)

BuJ said...

oh, media junkie, maybe i didn't stress my point very clearly.. i think that the image of uae culture needs to change to reflect the origins of the ppl.. a bit like 3eemis have somehow integrated into uae culture (they are of iranian origins).. although they are seen as a lower class coz of their non-arab roots, they are accepted as emarati

same thing needs to happen with other people.. but the thing is that 3eemis always wanna stay here.. and would not go back to iran

i think we need more open minds and hearts really..

stimulus.. the reason i don't always give my opinion on these things is coz i want to first hear what people say and also (this is the main reason) i feel tired to debate with somewhat mentally inferior people about mundane stuff they do not understand. they become rude and arrogant and that's not what a debate is about..

so i just turn comment moderation on and let them be!

however, ur all welcome to give me ur opinions.. it's always good to read an educated reply :)

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

BUJassem, I never once argued that we were all the same. Infact, please see this post I made a long while back:

http://www.al-emarati.com/2008/09/this-article-was-prompted-by-post-on.html

The citizens of the UAE come from a VERY wide range of backgrounds. And I really have no reservations against adding to this variety, GIVEN some pre-requisits are met:

1. The constitution MUST be modified to only allow citizenship to MUSLIMS. Currently our constitution cites that the Govt will not discriminate against any citizen based on blah blah blah AND RELIGION.

However, it also states that the UAE is officially a muslim country. So this has to be fixed. SADLY I have MET an ex prostitute from lebanon with a UAE passport (Thank God she didnt have proper citizenship)

2. UAE citizenship should only be open to other nationals of the GCC. the people who were here form other places ages ago had time to adopt the UAE culture. My family it's self originated in Iran over 120 years ago, but today, we are 100% adopters of UAE culture. I dont think that a modern day Iranian can do the same.

The farther we move from the GCC, the more different a person's background will be, and in a country where we are trying to PROTECT our culture, that is counter productive. Allowing citizenship to only GCC people will insure that the language, religion, and general heritage aspects of the people of the UAE are kept intact.

Look at media junkie, do we want a fat, alcohol drinking, whorish clothes wearing indian as an Emarati? In her short skirts and inability to even converse in the country's dialect? these are ethe same people that argue that they have been here forever and feel like 2nd class "citizens" well you ARENT a citizen, and if you wanted a shot at maybe beaing treated well, and maybe being one at some point, your 1st order of business should be to go get some abayas and sheilas and to learn what our culture accepts and doesnt and learn some Arabic.

But no, you come here, are VERY WELL paid for being here, then claim to get nothing for your efforts. Your pay is your compensation. If you dont like it, LEAVE.

3. Prospective nationals need to take tests. Lots of them. and after passing these tests must be followed closely for about 10 years. I have seen Iraqis in Kandooras and Shailas on their UAE passports and yet now that they have them, run around dressed like shaggy from scooby doo and whores.

Oddly enough, I personally know a guy my age who's family is from Jordan, but were given UAE citizenship, he takes pride in that he is an Emarati, speaks like us, dresses like us... We've had long conversations on this subject, and he stated that from even before the passports his father made it a point that since they live here, they should act like people here. People will often say WHEN IT ROME... but dont actually apply it.

Being here for 40 years means nothing, because YOU HAVE BEEN PAID 23456789 times better than anywhere else, that is why you have lived here. your time spent here was rewarded in pay. NOTHING else should be expected, but then again foreigners here are a greedy bunch.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

4. We should only allow citizenship to those holding college degrees. Hear me out, we already have a 14% unemployment rate, that is HUGE given that we have so much in terms of means and capability. Often, the single most cited reason for this is "lack of education."

So we dont need to import more uneducated people. In the 90 the late Sh. Zayed BROUGHT over a bunch of yemenis and naturalized them. They mostly live in the Bani Yas area of Abu Dhabi now. They were GIVEN houses, monthly salaries (for nothing) and to this day the handouts keep rolling into them. They were mostly uneducated, from the rural areas of yemen. I consider this Sh. Zayed's ONLY mistake. Because of how they are given things, few of the now 2nd generation want to try for an education.

The govt is doing wonders to educate us internally, so we need to only allow people in who are less likely to contribute to the welfare state and unemployment and more likely to be able to nation build in the long run.

After 15 or 20 years of that, We can then open it up to other places like Iraq, Jordan, Egypt...

As long as they are muslim, can speak Arabic, and are willing to adopt 100% of ur customs, from dress to manners, I have no issues whatso ever.

In a perfect world I'd also start deporting foreigners who arent absolutely needed, clamping down on VISAs for businesses, does a small cafe need 6 workers?!

And in the best world, all the GCC countries would implement all the crap we've been force fed since 5 years old so that in my lifetime, we can be one country. That would probably be the single best way to fix the imbalance of the UAE's population. It would also help the region's stability and power on the world stage.

BuJassem, I doubt you dont have at least some distant family in Qatar, or Bahrain, or the KSA... Wouldnt you prefer if we were all one nation?

I know i would.

So the subhuman who called me a racist, how am I a racist when I have written AGES ago about the variety of ethnicities in the UAE and said that it is a GOOD thing? How am I a racist when I say yes, give citizenship to THOSE WHO DESERVE IT AND CAN ASSIMILATE INTO OUR CULTURE?

Sorry, but an indian in short skirts or a brit here for 30 years cant be assimilated. My proof? They havent done it thus far, have they?

Choose your words wisely, I'm made up of FOUR nationalities myself, I couldnt be racist even if I tried.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

What does the UAE really gain from such a high and egotistic level of nationalism? Does it create more career opportunities? Does it help us be more aware of our world and surroundings? Does it expand the horizons of our knowledge? As far as I'm concerned, we, in the UAE, pay the big bucks for the specialists and professionals that come abroad and assist in building our country, the UAE.

No offense intended, but your discourse sounded like what I would hear from anti-immigration leagues in the US; supporters want immigrants and expats out, yet they don't want to do the undesirable work that the immigrants and expats do. Paradoxical much?

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

a bit like 3eemis have somehow integrated into uae culture (they are of iranian origins).. although they are seen as a lower class coz of their non-arab roots, they are accepted as emarati

With ministers, secretaries, and most of the billionaire families being Eimi, I would like to know who's opinion it is that they are a lower class.

Last I checked I was in the highest class a non-royal can belong to.

Looks around... Yep.

It surely isnt the govt's position, as many many Eimis hold very important places in Govt. Al Ghurair is imi, he is the CHAIRMAN of the FNC. Al Fahim, Al Fitaim, Al Khoori... All Eiyam, and all of the highest "class" in the UAE.

The Eiyam of Al Ain are seen as total equals, so much so that from an early stage, we're talking 60-80 years ago they were accepted to marry into, and marry families like the Darmakis and Dhaheris. You do know that those 2 families are Abu Dhabi royalty, yes?

Please explain how the Eiyam are of a "lowr' class in light of what I have just said? If anything, Arab Emaratis are envious that on Arabs have flourished in the UAE. This simply shows the racist mentality of Arabs in general.

Even Salman al Farsi had the same issues, till the prophet PBUH put a stop to it. Arabs cant handle the fact that someone who's roots over 100 years ago arent arab are doing well.

And as I stated, many high ranking govt officials are Eiyam, and most of the big trade families, especially in Dubai, are Eiyam, and Eiyam have married, and been accepted into, royal families.

The only people who see the Eiyam as less than them are the "Bu Yemen" that are trash to begin with.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

The UAE is a very young country, and has a very small citizenbase. It must protect it's self, not from globalization, or change, but too much globalization and too much change.

The protectionism that I am talking about is what has enabled you to go off to the US and speak as an adult when in fact you are not just yet.

In the US, it's a bit different, I went to school in Arizona, RIGHT ON THE BORDER of the immigrant issues. And I do agree with those right wing americans that patrolled their borders with their own guns. It is a right to protect what is yours.

this country is mine. Might not be perfect, or even amazing, but in the end of the day, after all the oil and bruhaha, it's all I have.

We pay big bucks for know how, EXACTLY. We pay ALOT for that know how. That is the DEAL. That is what CONTRACTS, especially labor/work contracts are for.

In the US they have few "expats" in proportion to the citizenbase. Immigrants are different. The US has immigrants, and that is FINE. No one in Arizona or anywhere else ever bitched about immigrants, as the US is a country of immigrants.

They bitched about ILLEGAL immigrants. The US welcomes around 50K people a year as permanent residents and many people are made into citizens there.

Here we dont have Immigrants. We have foreigners. Migrant workers who we IMPORT and PAY WELL (or else they wouldnt come) for their services.

That is the beginning and end of it. We IMPORT them to WORK for us. And trust me, we allow there migrant people much more than many other countries do to non-permanent residents.

Now, since they are paid very well (you agreed on this) for their work, what else is there to do? The foreigners here act like we have a bill that needs paying, or a balance that is in deed of payment, a debt.

There is no debt, if you have been here for 45 years, it has been because we paid you well. We thank you for your work, although we really should because you were paid for it, and we kindly ask you to go back home now.

Simple. Where oh where is any of what I said bad?

HOWEVER, those who come from similar backgrounds, and can assimilate themselves into our culture, should be scrutinized and made nationals. My 1st boss in my 1st job was a lebanese man who came to work in a Kandoora and sufra/agal. He spoke as I do, and is Muslim... Kind of... Shi3i. But anyways. I would have NO issues with this time of migrant worker becoming a fellow citizen. He has done his part not only to work for the UAE (Which once again I remind you, he is paid for) but has EMBRACED the UAE in full.

I'd say less than 10% of all migrant workers in the UAE have even attempted to embrace the UAE culture. And because of that they are assets, for us to use, and discard. At least we pay them, your beloved US was created on the backs of slaves that were not given a dime.

Although I kind of like that a young guy is as bright as you (As you probably know, much of our youth these days are air heads) I would still put you into the "happy go lucky kumbaya" class of people.

Reality isnt as nice as it is in your young head Khalood.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

btw Khalood, if you want, please email me at fooly_cooly_009@hotmail.com and I will add you to my blog Al-Emarati.com so that you can post your views as well, that in almost every instance, counter my own.

I hope your studies are going well and the snow isnt too bad.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

"a bit like 3eemis have somehow integrated into uae culture (they are of iranian origins).. although they are seen as a lower class coz of their non-arab roots, they are accepted as emarati

With ministers, secretaries, and most of the billionaire families being Eimi, I would like to know who's opinion it is that they are a lower class.

Last I checked I was in the highest class a non-royal can belong to.

Looks around... Yep.

It surely isnt the govt's position, as many many Eimis hold very important places in Govt. Al Ghurair is imi, he is the CHAIRMAN of the FNC. Al Fahim, Al Fitaim, Al Khoori... All Eiyam, and all of the highest "class" in the UAE.

The Eiyam of Al Ain are seen as total equals, so much so that from an early stage, we're talking 60-80 years ago they were accepted to marry into, and marry families like the Darmakis and Dhaheris. You do know that those 2 families are Abu Dhabi royalty, yes?

Please explain how the Eiyam are of a "lowr' class in light of what I have just said? If anything, Arab Emaratis are envious that on Arabs have flourished in the UAE. This simply shows the racist mentality of Arabs in general.

Even Salman al Farsi had the same issues, till the prophet PBUH put a stop to it. Arabs cant handle the fact that someone who's roots over 100 years ago arent arab are doing well.

And as I stated, many high ranking govt officials are Eiyam, and most of the big trade families, especially in Dubai, are Eiyam, and Eiyam have married, and been accepted into, royal families."


And why exactly are hard working expatriates subjected to be treated in accordance with "Arab" ignorance and apathy?

Khalood said...

"The only people who see the Eiyam as less than them are the "Bu Yemen" that are trash to begin with."

&

"So we dont need to import more uneducated people. In the 90 the late Sh. Zayed BROUGHT over a bunch of yemenis and naturalized them. They mostly live in the Bani Yas area of Abu Dhabi now. They were GIVEN houses, monthly salaries (for nothing) and to this day the handouts keep rolling into them. They were mostly uneducated, from the rural areas of yemen. I consider this Sh. Zayed's ONLY mistake. Because of how they are given things, few of the now 2nd generation want to try for an education."

ABIT, if I may point out, my family (namely grandparents) escaped Yemen during the Civil War between the North and South in the 1960's. The UAE at that time was not the UAE we currently know and adore; UAE was not a sovereign nation at that time.

Neither my parents, nor myself have ever visited Yemen. Why would we? Yet, by some of our ignorant fellow Emiratis and Arabs, we are still tagged as "Bu Yemen". People like you express mild hate by calling a segment of Emirati population as trash. Heck, a minor portion wants us to be deported.

You may not know this, but the generational effect of the Civil War and migration to the UAE made my family very frugal when it came to finances and the methods of handling money respectively.

The way I observed it, we are considered astray from the mainstream culture because my family does not spend lavishly on our houses, ranches, fleets of housekeepers, cooks, and maids, clothing, etc. This is just one aspect of mainstream culture that is perniciously counterproductive.

Another mainstream culture that is pervasive in the UAE is speeding. Mainstream culture had it that if a person does not speed at least 20kms above the posted speed limit, then a person is considered to be a failure in driving. Culture, there you go!

New mainstream cultures have always kept coming and going, and they are as meaningless and obsolete as it can get. BlackBerry, Toyota FJ's, Land Cruisers, BMW, Mercedes Benz, Nokia Phones (in the near past), and much more kept defining us as "locals" in respect to the mainstream culture.

If you want to talk about mistakes, then do not be superficial about it. Emiratis of Yemeni origins are mostly emulating what their peers are doing.

So, my household does not have a BMW or Mercedes Benz. It does not have a cook or maid. It has 2 Pugs and a Collie Mix. It also has a music practice room. No lavish swimming pools, tents, more-than-one living room, etc. But the definition of mainstream culture, we, my household, is anything but local.

If you are so keen on culture, be original about it and live in the desert in a tent with camels and goats? Really ...

"As long as they are muslim, can speak Arabic, and are willing to adopt 100% of ur customs, from dress to manners, I have no issues whatso ever."

I am very sorry, but what gives you the authority to force people to change their practices to accommodate such egotistic views on your behalf?

There are cultures that are lighter-years richer than the one we have in UAE, dating back thousands of years ago. Saying that those people should abandon their culture, religion, and language all together for what you, or a portion of the public believe in is highly narcissistic. Stop flaunting about equal opportunities when you have no remote concept of what is equal.

By all means, you, and people like you, do not have the right to select the culture, religion, and speaking language of the average persons. It is unethical and antithetical to all means of progress. If you want to excel, diversity is your key.

rosh said...

BuJ, thank you for this post. I'm glad there is this debate, not just on blogsphere but in the UAE media. This is a healthy start toward understanding the sort of folks who truly make up the UAE and wish to be part of it. I am also thrilled to read Peter Hellyer's thoughts and concur with almost everything he writes, very relatable. It's also wonderful to hear voices from people, similar to MJ, myself and several other at the UAECB. Living in North America the past 10 years, I've come across several "UAEAians" and the commonality is talking about our home, specifically the growing days and the various Emirates & towns. I think it was sort of the initial step in realization, on "hometowns" and who we are in wholesome. It's true, some of us do not speak the language and remain oblivious to more than some of the local cultural ways, however, we and many like us are in reality (perhaps not in theory) a significant part of what makes the UAE it is today. Personally, I think or rather believe people who've been born & raised, and those who have lived in the UAE their significant adult and working lives should be considered a part of it in some tangible shape or form. I do not believe, religion or 'culture' precedes what one feels for one's place of birth. I also believe, talk about Citizenship is immature, coz we all know the country is young and learning to stand on its own on several socio-political ways. However, some sort of residency program, not dependant on a work visa should be considered, especially for those, I've mentioned above. That said, you're correct, the choices aren't easy and wealth, as often, complicates the process, dilutes transparency. However, looking at the past and the future, most of Peter's thoughts and those similar to him, seem an inevitable reality. I believe all involved should work together, for the common good of this young nation and its towns, held dear in our hearts.

BTW, I love reading your blog and humble my 2 fils, I think comment moderation helps. There shall always be those who'd love to trash a forward thinking post, views and people.

rosh said...

*..in wholesome*(?) - strikeout.

"Stop flaunting about equal opportunities when you have no remote concept of what is equal."

&

If you want to excel, diversity is your key."

Mature and wise words, Khalood. Your words hold true in what make up your growing nation many like I feel is home.

The UAE as a whole is not a cookie cut society or culture. I hope people who make up the UAE share productive dialogue, exchange the varied local and the expats' ways of life, bridge the gaps -- bring about a sense of understanding and assimilation at an intrinsic level. That's what is important. Citizenship is so after the fact --I don't even know why some folks keep pushing citizenship into every debate? It's irrelevant at this point. A residency or an alternative program to the work visa is something to be put forth for discussion.

@ABIT,

"Permanent residency COULD be given to those who can SPEAK LIKE US, LOOK LIKE US, are MUSLIM.

So basically just people from other gulf countries. We dont nee Kumar and John being connected to the UAE in any way other than his contract."

And then, your views from "here

"I dont consider Indians "Expatriates" I would really not have an issue with Indians being made permanent residents. I have yet to meet one who was not qualified for what he does, and does it well.

British, Americans, French. Eh. And foreign Arabs are the worst.."

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

Rosh, I was namely talking about those specific indians who I have worked with, who again, do dress in Khaleeji clothing, and have some of their daughters married to Emaratis. I'm sorry I didnt make that more apparent.

Khalood. I have no responses for you if you are a bu yemen. I AM one of those who wants your kind deported. Stay with your dogs at home.

However I will say this. Diversity is the bitch of those who cant control their own destiny. And although I might be told that its not up to me how things are done, my family is thank god in positions where they do affect how things are done. and on the 10th when Sh. Mohamed set the outline for the UAE in 2021, he was very adament on EMARATIS and keepiing things how they are.

Thank God someone has a brain.

Stimulus said...

It's unfortunate ABIT that although you speak like an educated person, your ideas are completely close-minded and you are unprepared for reality.

Khulood and rosh, excellent responses!

I would've said more in response to ABIT, but I feel just as BuJ said it "i feel tired to debate with somewhat mentally inferior people about mundane stuff they do not understand. they become rude and arrogant and that's not what a debate is about.."

rosh said...

@ABIT, I've tried to debate with you in the past (and as evident here on this forum), you seem unable to face up and comprehend (or rather choose not to) oppossing views -- instead choose the most vile, uncouth and derogatory language against anyone with forwarding thinking views that challenge or oppose yours. And, you, claim to be a Muslim with culture.

A debate is just that -- a debate. You don't have to concur with my views and, I with yours. But if you wish to be heard and your views respected, learn to respect opposing views. BuJ, Khalood, a 19yr old (or Dana a 16 yr old) Emiraties -- show the world the future of the UAE is bright, despite the challenges. Also, as someone who is from mixed backgrounds I can agree with Stimulus -- just because you have 4separate origins, does not mean you or anyone similar, aren't capable of being racist. Your words here on this form speak for themselves.

To add to Khalood's thoughts below -

"And why exactly are hard working expatriates subjected to be treated in accordance with "Arab" ignorance and apathy?"

Zayed made sure folks like you, the Eyams and others, are assimilated into the UAE not just by handing out passports, but having respect and understanding come your way -- when the UAE wasn't even UAE back then. You seem focused on wealth, power, passports and everything else external -- like what people wear and should speak -- however MUCH has changed subsequently. More people from varied backgrounds and cultures define what the UAE is today -- just look around you. For instance the number of Churches you see today. The sort of food, the clothes, the festivities, the schools, the culture and the ways of life. What makes you think, if someone does not speak Arabic or wear a Khandoora, they feel nothing toward their town of birth or the towns people have lived most of their lives? What gives you the belief if someone isn't Muslim -- they aren't aware of the Muslim ways in the UAE and practice nothing of it? What makes you think all folks past retirement and have moved out of the UAE -- ever been to Christian cemeteries in the UAE? A human being's place of birth is weaved into the memories and the experiences that define who they are or have become. This is what connects them to such places and towns. As for most most UAE expats, let me assure you, it has NOTHING to do with some passport or supposedly the bag of goodies that come with it. After all, many like I, have done brilliantly well (touch wood) without the extra goodies or what have you. Some have given up the better options, fuloos and freedoms in foreign shores to go back "home"! Of course, there are the good and the bad like in every basket of apples.

...continued below

rosh said...

No self respecting individual could change themselves 180 degrees to be like someone else. Similar to marriage and a family, nobody wishes to be part of a town or nation, if the assimilation isn't a two way process with respect and understanding toward one another. As for being 100%"LIKE US" -- I do not believe a non-Bedouin Emirati can be 100% similar to a Bedouin Emirati. You can baptize some folks in the holy cultural ways as you please, however, traces of the individuals origin, certain thoughts and culture shall always continue to be part of them. I believe you for instance, someone of part Persian origin may feel for Iran and certain ways of its life at some level, more so than a Bedouin Emirati. I partly say this because, I have Emirati friends of Persian origin, who share the view. And there is nothing wrong with that as long as the individual knows where his / her loyalties lie. IMHO the UAE is a bit of a complex society and it takes MATURE dialogue to better understand and reach across one another. The past years, the rather conservative societies that make up the UAE, have lived more so in a silo setup -- each community within itself with little cross interaction. However that' s changing now, especially with 2nd / 3rd generation folks and globalization setting in. We need mature dialogue -- not name calling and anger.

And FYI, my views above aren't of the illegal aliens you've encountered here in the US. I agree with some of what you say in that context. I get the libertarian brouhaha you seem to have picked up from Arizona.

rosh said...

And ABIT, I apologize if any portion of what I've said comes across insenstive / hurtful -- not my intent at all.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

rosh said...
@ABIT, I've tried to debate with you in the past (and as evident here on this forum), you seem unable to face up and comprehend (or rather choose not to) oppossing views -- instead choose the most vile, uncouth and derogatory language against anyone with forwarding thinking views that challenge or oppose yours. And, you, claim to be a Muslim with culture.

Because you believe it it's automatically FORWARD thinking? No, it isnt. You may choose to believe that, and that's your right, but that doesnt make it a fact.

I am very glad to debate, but I debate with humans, not "people" who are beneath me. And most of the people I have met on blogs, the 16 year old whore, and this kid, are infact beneath me.

I am a muslim, BUT I have always said that my country comes FIRST. That might not make me the best Muslim, but hey, with so many in bars and at brothels, Im sure Im not at the bottom.

As for me being cultured, I am deathly trying to preserve the one of mine that I chose to keep. So much so that I dont want it dying because of trash that we allowed to run rampant in our country.

As for being racist, no, racism is a hate or dislike of a particular ethnicity or the feeling of superiority towards that or those ethnicities. I actually have a general dislike for HUMANITY. If you still view that as racism, at least Im an equal opportunity racist (noting that Im just as harsh with my own family)

Yes, I did pick up alot from being around cowboys. If If I dream of anything, it's the right to bear arms because my country is at WAR with filth and it's self. Guns are good. Very good.

I look forward to the day when some crazy people (probably more bu yemen) blow up JBR and the like. THEN maybe I'd have SOME respect for them.

Yes, it SICKENS me that the UAE is in the place it is. A can of worms was opened long ago and sadly, I dont think there is a way to fix that, not as I would like. We need to start deporting and killiing people off right now. Rounding them up off the streets and making them "vanish" Plant some pot on them, I dont care.

Rosh, you can claim what you want, but the cold hard truth of the world is that the world lives and dies on money and power. You can call my rants immature if you choose to, but that is the cold hard truth.

Khalood knows it, he wants sympathy for him not having a mercedes or not having a maid... Well I dont have any, I PITTY him because he is stuck in a class that he will not come out of or move up from unless he realizes that MONEY AND POWER are the ways to do it.

Sir, Zayed may have added to what the 3iyam were later on, but even before oil it was us (And places like Kuwait) who gave THEM money. This is a fact. The khooris and the Al Futaims and MY OWN GRANDFATHER loaned the ruling families money. My family's been here before Zayed and Shaikhbut, so lets not pretend that a family with 120 year roots in Abu Dhabi is the same as one who came over 50 or so years ago. Not saying all 3iyam were as well off, the Khunjis started out as house maid, but their were Sh. Zayed's maids. Again, money and power (and networking) gets you places, hippy talk doesnt.

It isnt, you want proof? The classes that both of us are in. It is about TRUST here. WHO the rulers trust. And they trust me and my family more than Khalood's and his.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

Sure, no one can change 180 degrees. And thats not what Im asking for. Im not saying tell people change and you can stay. Im saying to those who TOOK IT ON THEIR SELVES TO CHANGE, allow them to stay.

I know so many lebanese, Kuwaitis, Omanis, and even Tunisians who HAVE spent 40 years assimilating, and its sad, very very sad that they cannot stay when our shaikhs are handing out passports to their old hookers.

Fair? Me thinks not.

As you doing well without what I have, I dont doubt that, I actually respect you alot if I dont agree with you, but the fact is if you were from here, in the same class, you'd have done much more and have much more. FACT.

As for people living in their own classes/worlds here. Very true. And it's worked. True, these days I have friends from RAK, and they are friends with me, some things have changed, but some havent and wont ever. When that friend from RAK, who's father loves me hinted at marrying a distant family member of mine he flipped. YOU WILL MARRY YOUR COUSIN.

Im sorry if that's a blow to your diversity/globalization/hippie talk, but its the reality we live it.

Emaratis are held together by their families and their greater clans. That has been the way for THOUOSANDS of years, and probably will NEVER change. Not you, nor Khalood, nor the man in the moon is going to change that. because thst who we are.

Do you know what happens when someone is natiralized? They live a very excluded life. They are not REAL emaratis. They are not given the chance to be. They are LEGALLY, but not ACTUALLY.

Sad? Yes, but reality, and that isnt going to change either.

You can DEBATE all you want, but the fact is that my way is (with some variations) what has and is going on, and there isnt any sign of that changing.

All these kids stating otherwise come from families that have, and will never be given the chance to have any say or power in these matters.

And Im assuming you know this if you spent as long in the UAE as you claim.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

it has NOTHING to do with some passport or supposedly the bag of goodies that come with it.

Then why is it so coveted? Explain that and stay fashionable.

Maybe YOU have ethics, and drive, and arent a gold digger. But the majority of humanity ISNT like you.

As I stated, Zayed brought over many people for "nation building" who to this day live in free govt housing, are handed free money, and havent in a generation tried to better themselves.

There are some shining examples to the contrary, sure. and that makes me happy, but the majority of people who were given citizenship of this country took it for the goodies. They arent supposed, they exist, and you know that.

And of course, these people may have fond memories of where they were born, but as I remember during the gulf way, when shit got bad, MANY left. MANY.

Plus, I have almost zero respect for people who would switch their nationalities. It erks me. No matter what nationality. All these people running to Canada or the UK for passports... Traitors. They should be shot.

Thats what anyone seeking UAE naturalization is, a traitor to their own country. So we want to invite traitors in? What made them come here? Money, stability...

So what happens the minute those things are gone? They leave. THEY DID IT BEFORE.

No, It doesnt go down. I give the grace to other GCC nationals because by all accounts we should be one country. If you want to talk about FORWARD thinking there is no more than that. For the GCC to be oe single country, with a citizen base of about 65% or more, and the ability to be something, someone internationally.

You guys are comical. You talk about us allowing people too stay here indefinitely and maybe granting them citizenship when we cant even agree on a single thing internally or with our GCC brothers.

Very funny. We have 100K people who should be citizens who arent, and cant leave this land, we have a GCC economic zone that was supposed to be done when I was in Jr. High, and you are talking about Kumar and Raj being Emaratis.

Kumar makes my parata sandwiches and Raj washes my car. For that they get paid. Its win win. Thats the end of the relationship.

If the relationship isnt to their liking, the can go back to balandabad, there are one billion more that will make my paratas.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

I believe you for instance, someone of part Persian origin may feel for Iran and certain ways of its life at some level, more so than a Bedouin Emirati.

Not at all. Maybe my great grandfather, and maybe my grandfather, But my father hardly even speaks the language, and none of us do at all.

Sure, SOME traces will remain, the Shi3a we have here have some weird customs that are still alive, Im not insane or that arrogant.

Example, a good friend of mine is a Khoori (Surprise) his mother is Indian, and so at his wedding some things were a bit different (Women's wedding, so my female cousins told me)

Some differences will always be there. BUT we as 3iyam have been assimilating for 120 or more years!

We are now it 2010. Not I, nor most emaratis are willing to handle Kumar for 60 year for him to begin to adupt our ways. Infact, it's dangerous, because his ways might start to affect ours.

And that is WHY the govt has official identity and culture protection programs.

Because even the govt sees the danger, but has to be diplomatic about it.

I was very happy when not too long ago a govt official said to the media that the UAE is buying so many weapons because a large percentage of the UAE population is.

YES! It is a war, foreign and we need to 1. Fix it, which will take alot of time, and 2. Be ready. Things have already happened, In al ain when a bunch of pakistanis brought weapons in from Oman and started basically a mini country.

THIS IS A WAR. Pure and simple.

BuJ said...
ABIT, i'm not qualified to give an input. i'm a nobody.

Arent we all nobodies at some level and somebodies at others?

I am now tired of typing, and its 3 am, so Im going to bed. If anyone wants to "debate" anymore, they are free to buy me and my friend from RAK lunch tomorrow, I do better when there's food in my tummy.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

"Khalood. I have no responses for you if you are a bu yemen. I AM one of those who wants your kind deported. Stay with your dogs at home."

You never actually read what I posted thoroughly. What I said was even though neither my parents, nor myself have ever visited Yemen, our ignorant Emirati peers remain blurting nonsense. We lived and rose in the midst of the cities and towns in the UAE, yet we are still held solely to our origins. Not fair!

You keep saying about how young (implying immaturity) people like myself should be more aware of their surroundings. I tell you: loosen your pejorative discourse and condescending attitude and get off of your high horse. Open your self-centered and narrow-minded brain and try to get yourself assimilated in society.

If you are trying to gain attention by displaying such inflammatory rhetoric, way mature for you. If you are trying to galvanize your sense of patriotism, then you categorically failed by all standards. Act like a fellow Muslim before you ramble about how much of a Muslim you are. In short, your attitude sickens me.

---------------------------------

Stimulus,

It is Khalood, not Khulood. You know, a variation of the name Khalid xDD

---------------------------------

I just want also to thanks BuJ for hosting and moderating such a healthy venue of thought expression.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

"Khalood knows it, he wants sympathy for him not having a mercedes or not having a maid... Well I dont have any, I PITTY him because he is stuck in a class that he will not come out of or move up from unless he realizes that MONEY AND POWER are the ways to do it."

I am sorry if you understood that part of my post wrong, but I was talking about mainstream culture, which is far from what culture is all about. The items you have listed were mere examples. Rather than accumulating debt and passing in on the the next generations, it was my parents' aim (I suppose) to promote self-sufficiency and fiscal responsibilities. God bless our leaders, they did not cut us short on anything so that we would not have to look up to the elites such as yourself. Please, save your sour grapes for yourself; we do not need them.

"It isnt, you want proof? The classes that both of us are in. It is about TRUST here. WHO the rulers trust. And they trust me and my family more than Khalood's and his."

Trust, of which you are speaking about, is not ascribed to the elite or a certain segment of the population; our rulers are well aware of that. Trust is a reciprocal trait that is mutually cultivated between the rulers and their people, and amongst the people living in the community. I thought you were mature enough to be aware of that; I assumed wrong.

"Im sorry if that's a blow to your diversity/globalization/hippie talk, but its the reality we live it."

Reality does not ascribe perpetuity to itself.

Khalood said...

ABIT, (2)

"Emaratis are held together by their families and their greater clans. That has been the way for THOUOSANDS of years, and probably will NEVER change. Not you, nor Khalood, nor the man in the moon is going to change that. because thst who we are."

True to an extent. That does not mean that we are copycats of each other.

"Do you know what happens when someone is natiralized? They live a very excluded life. They are not REAL emaratis. They are not given the chance to be. They are LEGALLY, but not ACTUALLY.

Sad? Yes, but reality, and that isnt going to change either."


Not true becuase it's very opinionated. What are the qualifications that distinguishes a "real" Emirati from a "fake" one? Looks? Personality? Work ethics? Level of education? Dress? Religion? Job rank? Income? Ideological views? Advocated causes? Remember, stop generalizing the Emiratis because we are not copycats of each other; every Emirati is as real as their peers, whether they were blessed with fortune and social status or not.

"There are some shining examples to the contrary, sure. and that makes me happy, but the majority of people who were given citizenship of this country took it for the goodies. They arent supposed, they exist, and you know that."

Not true. You are making a very general assumption. Besides, goodies vary from person to another in definition. Some believe it to be money, others believe it to be the stability. The currency of each person differs.

Khalood said...

ABIT, (3)

"And of course, these people may have fond memories of where they were born, but as I remember during the gulf way, when shit got bad, MANY left. MANY.

Plus, I have almost zero respect for people who would switch their nationalities. It erks me. No matter what nationality. All these people running to Canada or the UK for passports... Traitors. They should be shot.

Thats what anyone seeking UAE naturalization is, a traitor to their own country. So we want to invite traitors in? What made them come here? Money, stability..."


Your opinion on people migrating for a better life is abhorrent. Migration is an inevitable humanitarian cycle. It happened now, it is still happening, and it will always happen. Many people migrate to give their children what they did not enjoy, or it escape persecution. It varies from person to another. Being judgmental is not a nice quality.

"We are now it 2010. Not I, nor most emaratis are willing to handle Kumar for 60 year for him to begin to adupt our ways. Infact, it's dangerous, because his ways might start to affect ours.

And that is WHY the govt has official identity and culture protection programs.

Because even the govt sees the danger, but has to be diplomatic about it."


These were the same words of prime of what historians refer to as Social Darwinists. If you refer to the essays by Edward A. Ross and the discourse of Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, you will see what I mean. These were the same excuses that the Old immigrants (namely white, Anglo-Saxon, native born Americans) said about the arriving new immigrants.

Going up. going down, the debate's main point is not citizenship, it is just an improved visa status.

"THIS IS A WAR. Pure and simple."

Oh get a grip of yourself. Being flamboyant really is a failure on your behalf to blow it out of proportion.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

rosh said...
And ABIT, I apologize if any portion of what I've said comes across insenstive / hurtful -- not my intent at all.

NOt at all. YOu are one of a very few people online I respect as I would in the real world. TO me most online people are IP numbers here for my entertainment. YOu are not so.

We shall go to a good Iranian restaurant when you are here next. I like food.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

get off of your high horse.

Why should I? For you? a 19 year old bu yemen who should be deported or killed? I think not. Im on a high horse because I earned it. dont like it? Tough. I AM fully assimilated into EMARATI society. I have no want or desire for this dribble that has become the UAE society.

In short, your attitude sickens me.

My attitude sickens trash? GO BACK TO THE MOUNTAINS OF YEMEN YOU WORTHLESS SUB HUMAN.

Clear enough for you? You are what we call a Nakira. A nothing. Not a nobody, that would imply you being human, and worth some inkling of respect, no, a nothing, like a used chair.

When have I ever gone on about how good a muslim I am? READ MY COMMENTS WELL, I even said I put my country BEFORE my religion, that in and of it's self makes me not the best muslim I could be. What is your point? Where is the "open mindedness" now? Or shall we all become Mutara3 hippies to be on your level? You are probably clinically insane kid.

If you are trying to gain attention by displaying such inflammatory rhetoric, way mature for you. If you are trying to galvanize your sense of patriotism, then you categorically failed by all standards.

But if I was trying to piss off a worthless yemeni kid, I seem to have at least kinda sorta succeeded.

Trust, of which you are speaking about, is not ascribed to the elite or a certain segment of the population; our rulers are well aware of that. Trust is a reciprocal trait that is mutually cultivated between the rulers and their people, and amongst the people living in the community. I thought you were mature enough to be aware of that; I assumed wrong.

Trust in the UAE's political structure = family and close friends. No more or less. I thought you were at least decently smart enough to figure that one out. Look at every high or semi-high ranking official in your beloved country. If between them ALL you can find 30 distinctive names I'd be very surprised.

Again, you live in a fairy land, and the reality is that the govt KNOWS you are nothing and KEEPS you there as nothing. When you are an under secretary give me a call and I'll take that back. ITS NOT GONNA HAPPEN.

Reality does not ascribe perpetuity to itself.

No sir, but reality is constant for a given period in time. RIGHT THIS SECOND, right now, what I am saying is how things are. And it seems like it will be for at least the next 10 or so years.

God willing, it will always be this way, with small variations... Your kind being sent back home for good for example.

And yes you were crying rivers basking in sympathy when you went on the "My family didnt have this and that rant."

It's the cool thing these days to be poor, or less well off, and those with means are supposed to feel bad about their hard work and good fortune.

Sorry, not happening.

BTW, Why are you in Ohio and is your whole family there? I assumed you were there for studies, but then some of your comments made me think your family lives there. Just wondering.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

So a string of insults from an online person is supposed to make me feel down? Have some shame on yourself and read what you are writing. Wow, just wow!

Like I said, I tried to offer you an explanation of what may attribute to the sense of Emiratism along with its mainstream culture and its examples, and you decided to turn it all into a person matter. How is that working out for you?

Also, I can really give a rats about whether I am "this" or "that". Please, putting people down in order to elevate yourself has gotten as repulsive as it can get. It never ceases to amaze me how arrogant people can become towards their fellow citizen.

and life moves on ...

"BTW, Why are you in Ohio and is your whole family there? I assumed you were there for studies, but then some of your comments made me think your family lives there. Just wondering."

Abu Dhabi Police Department is trying to get Emiratis to study Genetic Engineering and other biological sciences and forensic studies, due to the nonexistence of the local workforce in the Police Department. After careful scrutiny and testing and thorough interviewing, I was selected. At this moment, there are only 5 Emiratis working on their degrees in Genetic Sequencing and Analysis; I happen to be one of them.

I live here by myself; I have already surpassed what most my fellow Emiratis that I know of could not manage to accomplish in their first year. They seem hesitant with their language; Some of them are even stalling. Someone has to encourage them while they are abroad.

Anyways ABIT, charge at me all you want. Do not really mind; do not really care.

BuJ said...

wow Khalood, you're in GE? mashalla, this is a fantastic opportunity!

why did u get involved in it? it's a very complex and detailed science, and unfortunately not very well recognised here, and hence not well-rewarded.

hopefully it'll change with your generation and your efforts. bravo!

i have every respect for u trying to improve yourself professionally. i always think if we as emaratis had brains we'd be better than israel and usa put together. why? coz our government pays big bucks to educate us home and away and all we need is takers!
instead emaratis would rather just have a high school diploma and drive a toyota FJ cruiser.

and time to sleep.. adios buddy!

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

Anyways ABIT, charge at me all you want. Do not really mind; do not really care.

Care enough to keep responding dont cha bu yemen? And it continues. Once again you sift from the govt. even to send you for an education.

Yalla, hopefully one day the govt will realize it's become a welfare state for your kind and deport you all... or genocide. Im for that as well.

Again, good luck with your studies. Dont get anyone pregnant there. Your types have a habit of doing that as I recall.

Media Junkie said...

wow Khalood - Genetic Engineering. That is pretty amazing. I've always had an interest in forensics and genetic engineering myself.

Best of luck with all that.

And thanks rosh, Khalood.

Media Junkie said...

And as for staying in the country goes, there should atleast be some form of permanent residency that is not dependent on work permits.

Sadly, "If you don't like it, leave" policy only works so far. Especially in regards with educated people.

Sure there are plenty of blue-collar labourers in every third world country to replace the ones currently working in an indentured servitude here.

So rather than arguing with trolls who clearly prefer to degrade strangers with profane and derogatory names (clearly showing his uncouthness) than to have a reasonable debate, I'd rather just "leave".

rosh said...

Jeez! What happened here..I have much more to share, shall circle back with a thought or two, and hopefully we can have comments in context to this post and The National's article. There's obviously a lot of sensitivities involved. However, there's a lot of good that can come out of removing the constant job visa status for some of these folks discussed in this post and The National, without 'disturbing' the fragile naturalization balance, the culture, the socio-political ways of the nation. It can be a win-win situation if key elements and options are thought out, debated, discussed and understood and diligently implemented with due process.

@ABIT, sure, just don't kill me :-) though, if may say, I crave a shwarmah :-) It's like an American's craving for hotdogs & burgers on labour day, especially if he's been out of the country for a while haha!

@ Khalood, WOW indeed! The best in your endeavours. Hope winter isn't too bad in Ohio this year.

BuJ said...

btw, great to see a bit of debate going on.
i always enjoyed the comments more than posting!

ABIT, just so you know, i didn't want to publish your comment, and i did just to let u know that using language like "genocide" in completely unacceptable, especially against people who are human, let alone muslim, arab and above all UAE citizens.

guys, welcome, and please write freely!

Khalood said...

ABIT,

Good advice. Not well said; still, good advice.

Others,

Thanks everybody! Your comments are dearly appreciated. It's the nearest experience to feel as if I were back home. Thank you very much!

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

@ABIT, sure, just don't kill me :-) though, if may say, I crave a shwarmah :-) It's like an American's craving for hotdogs & burgers on labour day, especially if he's been out of the country for a while haha!

It is the same, as both will probably give you food poisoning.

Kill you? My dear fellow, I dont kill, nor hit nor even shout. Maybe you have a picture of a pissed off red faced guy shouting when you read my comments, Im actually more calm than a Buddhist.

No no, we will go to the Saudi Kitchen! or Al Marhabani, where they serve... Yemeni food... Oh I'm gonna get crap for this, anyways, good rice and meat, and harees and stuff, made fresh, right there... Just dont be on any type of diet on that day as this stuff WILL add to your Kgs.

Sadly, "If you don't like it, leave" policy only works so far. Especially in regards with educated people.

No, it works with educated people as well. If not from Pakistan then from Brazil, if not there than Malaysia, of not there then Ukrain. You'd be surprised where we can find well educated people who dont bitch to replace you. It's going on. And they are just as good.

And as for staying in the country goes, there should atleast be some form of permanent residency that is not dependent on work permits.

No, "Permanent" leads to citizenship. Which I am for IF they are from the GCC or have demonstrated over say... 40 years, that they have assimilated themselves into our culture. As you run around in dresses that are short, and blog about how you got illegal alcohol, You wouldnt be eligible.

So rather than arguing with trolls who clearly prefer to degrade strangers with profane and derogatory names (clearly showing his uncouthness) than to have a reasonable debate, I'd rather just "leave".

Manners and running and dancing around issues is what starts a political shitplace like the American political machine. I like being direct. It saves everyone alot of time.

Please do leave. A drinking, drug taking, chubby Indian "muslim" who blogs about nothing but the guy in Canada that she is sleeping with isnt a real "asset" to my country.

ABIT, just so you know, i didn't want to publish your comment, and i did just to let u know that using language like "genocide" in completely unacceptable, especially against people who are human, let alone muslim, arab and above all UAE citizens.

I figured it would be hit or miss. This whole topic aside though, do you not think, at least in a part of you, that genocide is sometimes justified?

Think about it, Had salahuddin just slaughtered every non muslim in Jerusalem we wouldnt be having half the issues we have today. There wouldnt be enough Jews, let alone ones with claims to that land, to make claims to that land.

Just some food for though. I believe that in some cases, and to preserve the greater good, genocide, murder, and the life are very much acceptable.

Good advice. Not well said; still, good advice.

And stay away from booze. The embassy will cut your cord the second anything bad happens. I saw it happen way too many time sadly.

Khalood said...

ABIT,

I can't; I'm not 21 yet. Even if I was, I have more productive means of spending my money and time besides studying. True, it's sad to see such great prospective graduated ruining their lives.

A Blessing in Tragedy said...

Not being 21 didnt stop MANY fellow UAE students in my batch to find their way to bottles and fuck up their futures.